Queenstown, New Zealand ~ The activity capital of the world:
View of Cecil Peak from Larch Hill

View of Cecil Peak from Larch Hill

View of Queenstown from the air

Aerial view of Queenstown

Winter view from Larch Hill

Winter view from Larch Hill

Sunset winter view from Larch Hill

Sunset winter view from Larch Hill




16 Panners Way,
Queenstown, 9300, New Zealand
Phone: +64 (3)442 4811
Fax: +64 (3)441 8882
Email:
or


Queenstown New Zealand, Activity Capital of the World:

Queenstown is nestled on the shores of Lake Wakatipu and surrounded by the majestic peaks of the Remarkable ranges and the Southern Alps. So named because "it was fit for Queen Victoria". Today Queenstown is recognized as New Zealand's premier visitor destination - most people that come to Skyline Gondola above Queenstown.New Zealand include Queenstown in their itinerary. Queenstown's reputation as the Adventure Capital of the Southern Hemisphere is well earned. There is something to thrill any adventure seeker as you will find out on our local activities page.

Queenstown is equally well-endowed with a great variety of relaxing activities including wine trails, art trails, museums, shopping and much more. Due to its' ideal location, Queenstown serves as a gateway to Fiordland & Mt Aspiring National Parks and destinations such as Te Anau, Wanaka, Milford and Doubtful Sounds. Downtown Queenstown.Glenorchy and the famous Gold town of Arrowtown are both within an easy drive. Like many other towns in this part of the South Island, Queenstown was originally a gold-mining centre. Gold was discovered on the Shotover River in 1862, and it became the second richest gold-bearing river in the world.

Queenstown is an interesting township for dining out and having fun all day till late night. There are a wide variety of restaurants and eating houses as well as bars and nightclubs which stay open till the early hours of the morning.

Like many other towns in this part of the South Island, it was originally a gold-mining centre. Gold was discovered on the Skippers CanyonShotover River in 1862, and it became the second richest gold-bearing river in the world. Makeshift towns of tents, stores, bars and grog shops sprang up almost overnight, establishing not only Queenstown, but also Arrowtown, 21 kilometres to the north east beside the Arrow River, and many other small encampments. Arrowtown retains its old world charm today. Its main street is lined with tall mature trees planted by the early settlers, which carpet the streets in scarlet during autumn. Many of the original stone and wooden buildings still stand, and within them are delightful shops, restaurants and cafes. There is also the Lakes District Museum.
Skier
Queenstown is an ideal base for skiing. Two major ski-fields are only a short drive away. Both ski fields have excellent facilities for skiers and snowboarders, including equipment hire, restaurants, cafes and ski schools. Coronet Peak, the more established area, has its best skiing from July to September. It is 15 kilometres from town up a sealed access road. There are groomed slopes and trails to suit beginners to experts, and deep powder in the back bowls. Night skiing will be a novel experience for many. The base facilities are designed for year round use, with the alpine slide and main chairlifts operating throughout the summer. Walkers on the Routeburn track

But best of all, the town is near to some of the finest walking tracks in the world. Across the river mouth, at Kinloch, is the start of the Routeburn Track, a 3 day trek which leads over the Harris Saddle Pass to the Fiordland and Mount Aspiring National parks.

We can also arrange transport for you to the Routeburn, Greenstone, Caples, Milford, Dart and Rees Valley walks. Larch Hill B&B is an idea place to start your tramps from. Queenstown has many other attractions and activities to enjoy. Check them all out and if you need any help at all, we are here for you. Don't hesitate to ask.